CFP: Feminism and Sound, Due 22nd July 2016

FEMINIST MEDIA STUDIES
Commentary and Criticism Call for Papers
16.6 Feminism and Sound
Feminist analysis of media is a field that has arguably been dominated by the visual. From selfies to music videos to films, feminist media scholars have done important work to unpack the way representations of gender look. But how does gender sound in contemporary media? How are femininity, masculinity, and other expressions of gender represented sonically across media platforms? Podcasts, Instagrams, Vines, streaming music, and traditional formats such as radio, television, and film, all present a rich ground for the study of sound from a feminist perspective. This issue of Commentary and Criticism invites essay contributions specifically on feminist approaches to sound in relation to a range of media. We are particularly interested in submissions from beyond North America and the UK. Possible paper topics include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:
  • Gendered soundscapes
  • Gender and speech
  • Gender and sound art
  • Feminist approaches to sound design in screen cultures
  • Women’s production of sound media
  • Feminist radio studies
  • Feminist readings of podcasts
  • Sonic performances of gender in popular music
The Commentary and Criticism section of Feminist Media Studies aims to publish brief (~1000 words), timely responses to current issues in feminist media culture, for an international readership. Submissions may pose a provocation, describe work in progress, or propose areas for future study. We will also consider book and event reviews, as well as contributions that depart from traditional academic formats. We encourage all submissions to strategically mobilize critique to also offer a productive contribution to both feminist politics and media studies. Submissions must go beyond mere description in order to be considered for publication in Commentary and Criticism.
Please submit contributions by 22nd July 2016, via email to guest editor, Philippa Lovatt (Philippa.Lovatt@stir.ac.uk) as well as standing editors, Susan Berridge (Susan.Berridge@stir.ac.uk) and Laura Portwood-Stacer (lportwoodstacer@gmail.com).
Questions and expressions of interest can also be addressed to Drs. Lovatt, Berridge and Portwood-Stacer in advance of the deadline.
Email submissions directly to Philippa Lovatt, Susan Berridge and Laura Portwood-Stacer, as submissions for Commentary and Criticism will not be correctly processed if submitted through the main Feminist Media Studies site.
Please be sure to follow the Feminist Media Studies style guide, which can be found at the following link: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1468-0777&linktype=44
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Women’s International News Service turns 30

The International Association of Women in Radio and Television has a new post commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Women’s International News Gathering Service (WINGS), and telling some of the story of its creation.

 

Check it out here.

The pioneering women of the BBC’s early years

A new article by Kate Murphy on pioneer has just been published in the BBC news magazine, outlining the position of women at the BBC.  Paid maternity leave, no marriage bar (until 1932) and thus – not surprisingly – a wide range of highly educated, pioneering broadcasters.  Also splendid photographs showing women engaged at all levels of production.  Check it out.

WOMEN IN SOUND / WOMEN ON SOUND :WISWOS 2016: 22 April, Lancaster: Educating Girls in Sound

The group Women in Sound/Women on Sound is hosting its annual forum  on 22 April, Peter Scott Gallery, Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts.

Educating Girls in Sound

Submission deadline February 8th, notification of selection February 15th.

WISWOS 2016 will take place at the Peter Scott Gallery at Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts. This years WISWOS event will focus on education. The previous very successful event at Lancaster in 2015 exhibited the excellent and varied work being done by women in many areas of sound, but also made clear their lack of visibility to the young. Despite the long and effective history of women working in and on sound, the numbers involved have not risen. What impact does the current education system have on young girls to deter them from moving into the fields of science, technology, the arts and engineering with sound? How can it be improved?

Key questions we wish to explore in the Forum are:

What happens in the music/sound tech classroom?
At what point do we see the drop from equal interest to little interest?
What initiatives already exist that do encourage girls to engage?
What can we do, and should we do it or not?

 

Full details here.

Cold War radio jamming – also a gendered division of labour…

Gendered divisions of labour are common in the history of radio production (and are one of the things groups like the Sound Women are seeking to address.)  It has happened quite regularly that once a technical task (such as sound technician) becomes a domain open to women, it is also devalued – or vice versa.

In discussion today with Andras Simongati-Farquhar, an MA student at the Insitute of Sonology in the Hague , he pointed out that such a phenomenon also seems to have occurred in the Soviet Union’s radio jamming activities.  This is mentioned in a section of a documentary by Rimantas Pleikys, former Minister for Communications and Informatics of Lithuania, called The Empire of Noise about Soviet radio jamming.  While transmitting jamming signals was the domain of the men, it was largely a corps of women who monitored frequencies for the effects of jamming.  Check out the section of the documentary here:

 

The Story of WHER, the all-women radio station in the US

Fugitive Waves has published a 2-part documentary on Memphis’s all-female radio station WHER, begun as a novelty in 1955 that quickly took on a personality of its own.  Click on the links for part 1 and part 2.

BBC online archive collection on suffragettes

At the risk of being too British centric (you, gentle readers can help us avoid that!) I just came across a fascinating collection of mostly radio documents relating to the suffragists on the site of the BBC archive.

Worth a listen.  I particularly like the 1946 talk by Ada Flatman.  The enthusiastic and melodic delivery alone is worthwhile.