Call for Papers: Signal Strength: women and media practice in conflict and crisis situations

Via the Radio Studies list:

The MeCCSA Radio Studies Network is delighted to announce a Call for Papers for ‘Signal Strength’, a symposium taking place on Thursday 8th March 2018, International Women’s Day at the University of Sheffield.

The deadline for abstracts is Monday 15 January 2018

Speakers confirmed so far include: Caroline Vuillemin, CEO, Fondation Hirondelle, Lausanne; Dr Helen Turton, University of Sheffield; Tala Halawa, BBC – West Bank, occupied Palestinian territories.

This symposium aims to examine the extent to which radio and other forms of media provide a platform for women who are, or have been, in conflict and crisis. Drawing on practice and academic research, discussions will explore multiple angles such as: gendering media strategies to improve the recognition and representation of women in peril; issues surrounding the safety and protection of women journalists and aid workers; and the limits and limitation of media freedoms.

We invite contributions from academics and practitioners with experience in radio and international conflict with the aim of exchanging knowledge and best practice. We welcome papers related to these themes or to the broader topic:

Use of radio and media in conflict environments
Use of radio to support women
Local and/or community radio in conflict/crisis
Women as (radio/media) audience in conflict/crisis
Empowering of women – and local communities – through radio (and media)
Radio in society in conflict-affected areas
Safety and protection of women journalists
Representation of women in conflict/crisis by the radio
Women and broadcasting technologies
Media freedoms – the limits and limitations of media strategies and policies, domestic and foreign
Stereotyping on air and in the media
Resourcing women’s radio journalism in conflict/crisis environments
Women in radio and on air – pedagogy and practice

Context:
According to the United Nations Refugee Agency (2017), women comprise approximately 50 per cent of refugees worldwide, mostly as a result of conflict, and are often put at greater hardship than men in these situations based upon their gender. With men either killed or at war, women become the heads of households, conservers of the community and rebuilders of the economy. The significant impact of conflict and crisis on women, who have also often become targets of sexual violence, is recognised in the UN Security Council’s resolution 1325.

As media coverage of women in conflict and crisis is increasing, the role of radio within this merits further exploration. Of all forms of media, radio occupies a particular place in conflict-affected areas, providing a low-tech and low-cost public space, being cheap and portable, not relying on a mains source of electricity and being able to target illiterate or orally-based cultures.

In certain circumstances, digital technologies also provide for the production and circulation of audio and visual media material. Such access to online communication channels facilitates conversation and dialogue from the comfortingly mundane to life-saving. For women in unstable societies, the intimate nature of radio also ensures a safe haven, away from male or mixed environments, in which to seek comfort, advice and helplines. It also provides the opportunity for women, as practitioners, to represent their female audiences and reach out to them.

When conflict and crisis necessitate migration, and when women and families are forced to move and live in foreign countries, media – and radio in particular – can play a significant role in the settling-in process. Not only can digital technologies enable the tuning-in online to estranged stations and the familiar voices of home, but local services can proffer the welcoming hand of friendship and provide opportunities for empowerment through cultural and linguistic guidance, as well as moral support.

Drawing on practice as well as academic research, this symposium aims to provide a platform not just for the theory but for voicing lived experiences too.

Submission guidelines:
Please send 150-200-word abstracts, with short bio, to e.heywood@sheffield.ac.uk by 15 January 2018.
Speakers will be notified of acceptance by 30 January 2018.

Overview of the symposium:
The registration fee will be £35 (£25 for early bird booking).
The symposium is open to anyone interested in this topic, regardless of whether they are presenting a paper.

SAVE THE DATE! Signal Strength. International Women’s Day 2018

(re-posted from the Radio Studies mailing list)

The MeCCSA Radio Studies Network (UK) is delighted to announce a ‘Save the Date’ for the forthcoming symposium “Signal Strength: women & media practice in conflict and crisis situations”. In association also with the MeCCSA Women’s Media Studies Network and the British Academy for the humanities and social sciences, the University of Sheffield is planning to host this one day event on Thursday 8th March 2018 – International Women’s Day.

This symposium will examine the extent to which radio – and other forms of media – provide a platform for women who are, or have been, in situations of conflict and crisis. A mix of talks and presentations will address the areas of radio and media, as implicated in women’s experiences of conflict and crisis around the world.

Drawing on practice and academic research, discussions will explore multiple angles such as: – gendering media strategies to improve the recognition and representation of women in peril; issues surrounding the safety and protection of women journalists and aid workers; and the limits and limitation of media freedoms.

Speakers include: Caroline Vuillemin, CEO, Fondation Hirondelle, Lausanne; Dr Helen Turton, University of Sheffield; Tala Halawa, BBC, West Bank. Details regarding further speakers and the cfp will be issued shortly but for now, please save the date! Please direct any queries to e.heywood@sheffield.ac.uk

Programme for Sonic Cyberfeminisms is now online…

Following on from the post on the Call for contributions: SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS   The conference will begin later this week.  Check it out here.

Call for contributions: SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS

SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS
UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN, UK
5-6th MAY 2017

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: 12 FEBRUARY 2017

Details here:  https://soniccyberfeminisms.wordpress.com/

New Article: “Innovation, women’s work and the documentary impulse: pioneering moments and stalled opportunities in public service broadcasting in Australia and Britain” by Virginia Madsen

Another dispatch from Australia:

 

Virginia Madsen has just published a new article comparing women’s work on features in Australian and Britain in Media Australia International.  (And indeed, do check out all of Media International Australia, Volume 161, Issue 1, dealing with women’s work)

 

Abstract

This article explores the roles of some of the key women producers, broadcasters and writers who were able to work within the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) from their foundational periods to the 1950s. Despite the predominantly male culture of radio broadcasting from the 1920s to the 1970s, this article considers the significance and long-term impacts of some of these overlooked female pioneers at the forefront of developing a range of new reality and ‘talk’ forms and techniques. While the article draws on primary BBC research, it also aims to address these openings, cultures and roles as they existed historically for women in the ABC. How did the ABC compare in its foundational period? Significantly, this paper contrasts the two organisations in the light of their approaches to modernity, arguing that BBC features, the department it engendered, and the traditions it influenced, had far reaching impacts; one of these relating to those opportunities opened for women to develop entirely new forms of media communication: the unrehearsed interview and actuality documentary programmes.

Australian Women in Radio online at the NFSA

Carla Teixeira has authored a new online feature for Australia’s National Film and Sound Archive  about “Women in Radio” chronicling the lives and work of many of Australia’s women radio pioneers.   Through texts and sound clips from seven key women in the early years of Australian wireless, it highlights the roles of women not only as presenters and performers but also as writers and producers from the earliest years.

 

 

 

Women hams ride the radio wave in India

Fascinating story on Scroll.in about amateur radio in India, including some references as well to the peculiar culture of gender that has evolved since the earliest days:

 

The term YL, or young lady, meaning an unmarried woman of any age, was coined in 1920 as a concession to the growing number of female hams. In time, when women married, they became known as XYLs, or ex-young ladies. After women operators in 1940 took umbrage to the second term, it became convention to call any licensed female ham, regardless of marital status, YL. Unlicensed wives of operators are XYLs. Men, regardless of marital status, are OM or old man.

Prasad is something of a trailblazer in the world of hams in India, with more awards and felicitations than she can list.

She became a ham in 1980, when there were perhaps only 50 YLs in India. She was a science student, but not familiar with electronics. Nor did she know English at the time, having studied in her first language, Telugu, until then. When she expressed interest in joining up, she faced stiff opposition from her community.

“Because my family are Brahmins, the Brahmins said, ‘No, no, you should not talk to gents. When you go on the radio, you will talk to gents only, no ladies’,” said Prasad. “But my brother-in-law supported me and said that if I become a ham, as a YL, I would be very popular. So I said okay.”

Prasad worked overtime to pick up the skills she needed. Today, she is among the most prominent hams in the country. Her call sign, or unique identifier with which she introduces herself while operating her radio, is VU2RBI.

Do check out the whole article!

Listen to the Sound of My Voice

Sounding Out!

Betrayal

I first realized there was a problem with my voice on the first day of tenth grade English class. The teacher, Mrs. C, had a formidable reputation of strictness and high standards. She had us sit in alphabetical order row after row, and then insisted on calling roll aloud while she sat at her desk. Each name emerged as both a command and a threat in her firm voice.

“Kelly Barfield?”

“Here,” I mumbled quietly. I was a Honor Roll student with consistent good grades, all A’s and one B on each report card, yet I was shy and softspoken in classes. This was an excellent way to make teachers amiable but largely go unnoticed. The softness of my voice made me less visible and less recognizable.

Mrs. C repeated my name. Caught off guard, I repeated “here” a little more loudly. She rose to her feet to…

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Sound::Gender::Feminism::Activism 2016: WHITE NOISE

Sound::Gender::Feminism::Activism 2016

Deadline July 8th, 2016

WHITE NOISE

A research event at

London College of Communication,
University of the Arts London

November 11th – 12th 2016

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTION Deadline July 8th, 2016

We are delighted to announce a call for the 3rd Sound::Gender::Feminism::Activism research event to take place in London on November 11th and 12th 2016.

Sound::Gender::Feminism::Activism is a bi-annual research event initially established in 2012 as a network for researchers, artists and performers working within intersectional fields of sound, gender, feminism and activism. SGFA::2012 delivered presentations and audio-visual artworks from thirty-six researchers, artists and performers from the UK, Europe, United States and Australia. SGFA::2014 incorporated performances, lectures, workshops and presentations from over thirty global participants. A publication that celebrates the presentations and participants from the previous two events will be launched at SGFA::2016.

SGFA::2016 seeks to query an expanded concept of White Noise. Working out from white noise’s original sonic conception of a random frequency, broad-based signal that masks everything else, white noise is all around us. White Noise is what Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman has termed a “sonic protocol” an often unquestioned norm based upon “culturally specific and socially constructed conventions that shape how sound is made, used and interpreted at a given moment”.

SGFA::2016 invites submissions for both twenty and ten minute contributions relating to the question;

How does whiteness, transmitted as an often sub-audible yet ubiquitous frequency, establish and maintain perceptual limits of what and who can be heard and how can this be changed?

How can we “confront and broadcast the underlying whiteness of the field and of the generic terms that provide so much currency in it: terms like “the listener,” “the body,” “the ear” and so on” (Stadler 2015) in ways that do not replicate racism, colonialism and gender violence but rather enable the audible transmission of alternative histories, forms, relations and ways of being.

SGFA::2016 will expand upon the previous research events through a combination of presentation formats over the course of two days; both twenty minute formal research papers and ten minute emerging researcher/artist presentations for the sharing of recent or ongoing work are sought.
This is an open call and we welcome responses from all relevant disciplines and will accept a variety of formats from academic presentations, proposals for artworks and documentation of artworks to more experimental contributions.

Please send expressions of interest, including the theme, topic and format of your presentation of around 200 words and a short biography of no more than 200 words by Friday 8th July, 2016 to SGFA2016.

Kindly supported by http://www.crisap.org

Cathy Lane
http://cathylane.co.uk

CFP: Feminism and Sound, Due 22nd July 2016

FEMINIST MEDIA STUDIES
Commentary and Criticism Call for Papers
16.6 Feminism and Sound
Feminist analysis of media is a field that has arguably been dominated by the visual. From selfies to music videos to films, feminist media scholars have done important work to unpack the way representations of gender look. But how does gender sound in contemporary media? How are femininity, masculinity, and other expressions of gender represented sonically across media platforms? Podcasts, Instagrams, Vines, streaming music, and traditional formats such as radio, television, and film, all present a rich ground for the study of sound from a feminist perspective. This issue of Commentary and Criticism invites essay contributions specifically on feminist approaches to sound in relation to a range of media. We are particularly interested in submissions from beyond North America and the UK. Possible paper topics include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:
  • Gendered soundscapes
  • Gender and speech
  • Gender and sound art
  • Feminist approaches to sound design in screen cultures
  • Women’s production of sound media
  • Feminist radio studies
  • Feminist readings of podcasts
  • Sonic performances of gender in popular music
The Commentary and Criticism section of Feminist Media Studies aims to publish brief (~1000 words), timely responses to current issues in feminist media culture, for an international readership. Submissions may pose a provocation, describe work in progress, or propose areas for future study. We will also consider book and event reviews, as well as contributions that depart from traditional academic formats. We encourage all submissions to strategically mobilize critique to also offer a productive contribution to both feminist politics and media studies. Submissions must go beyond mere description in order to be considered for publication in Commentary and Criticism.
Please submit contributions by 22nd July 2016, via email to guest editor, Philippa Lovatt (Philippa.Lovatt@stir.ac.uk) as well as standing editors, Susan Berridge (Susan.Berridge@stir.ac.uk) and Laura Portwood-Stacer (lportwoodstacer@gmail.com).
Questions and expressions of interest can also be addressed to Drs. Lovatt, Berridge and Portwood-Stacer in advance of the deadline.
Email submissions directly to Philippa Lovatt, Susan Berridge and Laura Portwood-Stacer, as submissions for Commentary and Criticism will not be correctly processed if submitted through the main Feminist Media Studies site.
Please be sure to follow the Feminist Media Studies style guide, which can be found at the following link: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1468-0777&linktype=44
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