Call for Papers: Signal Strength: women and media practice in conflict and crisis situations

Via the Radio Studies list:

The MeCCSA Radio Studies Network is delighted to announce a Call for Papers for ‘Signal Strength’, a symposium taking place on Thursday 8th March 2018, International Women’s Day at the University of Sheffield.

The deadline for abstracts is Monday 15 January 2018

Speakers confirmed so far include: Caroline Vuillemin, CEO, Fondation Hirondelle, Lausanne; Dr Helen Turton, University of Sheffield; Tala Halawa, BBC – West Bank, occupied Palestinian territories.

This symposium aims to examine the extent to which radio and other forms of media provide a platform for women who are, or have been, in conflict and crisis. Drawing on practice and academic research, discussions will explore multiple angles such as: gendering media strategies to improve the recognition and representation of women in peril; issues surrounding the safety and protection of women journalists and aid workers; and the limits and limitation of media freedoms.

We invite contributions from academics and practitioners with experience in radio and international conflict with the aim of exchanging knowledge and best practice. We welcome papers related to these themes or to the broader topic:

Use of radio and media in conflict environments
Use of radio to support women
Local and/or community radio in conflict/crisis
Women as (radio/media) audience in conflict/crisis
Empowering of women – and local communities – through radio (and media)
Radio in society in conflict-affected areas
Safety and protection of women journalists
Representation of women in conflict/crisis by the radio
Women and broadcasting technologies
Media freedoms – the limits and limitations of media strategies and policies, domestic and foreign
Stereotyping on air and in the media
Resourcing women’s radio journalism in conflict/crisis environments
Women in radio and on air – pedagogy and practice

Context:
According to the United Nations Refugee Agency (2017), women comprise approximately 50 per cent of refugees worldwide, mostly as a result of conflict, and are often put at greater hardship than men in these situations based upon their gender. With men either killed or at war, women become the heads of households, conservers of the community and rebuilders of the economy. The significant impact of conflict and crisis on women, who have also often become targets of sexual violence, is recognised in the UN Security Council’s resolution 1325.

As media coverage of women in conflict and crisis is increasing, the role of radio within this merits further exploration. Of all forms of media, radio occupies a particular place in conflict-affected areas, providing a low-tech and low-cost public space, being cheap and portable, not relying on a mains source of electricity and being able to target illiterate or orally-based cultures.

In certain circumstances, digital technologies also provide for the production and circulation of audio and visual media material. Such access to online communication channels facilitates conversation and dialogue from the comfortingly mundane to life-saving. For women in unstable societies, the intimate nature of radio also ensures a safe haven, away from male or mixed environments, in which to seek comfort, advice and helplines. It also provides the opportunity for women, as practitioners, to represent their female audiences and reach out to them.

When conflict and crisis necessitate migration, and when women and families are forced to move and live in foreign countries, media – and radio in particular – can play a significant role in the settling-in process. Not only can digital technologies enable the tuning-in online to estranged stations and the familiar voices of home, but local services can proffer the welcoming hand of friendship and provide opportunities for empowerment through cultural and linguistic guidance, as well as moral support.

Drawing on practice as well as academic research, this symposium aims to provide a platform not just for the theory but for voicing lived experiences too.

Submission guidelines:
Please send 150-200-word abstracts, with short bio, to e.heywood@sheffield.ac.uk by 15 January 2018.
Speakers will be notified of acceptance by 30 January 2018.

Overview of the symposium:
The registration fee will be £35 (£25 for early bird booking).
The symposium is open to anyone interested in this topic, regardless of whether they are presenting a paper.

SAVE THE DATE! Signal Strength. International Women’s Day 2018

(re-posted from the Radio Studies mailing list)

The MeCCSA Radio Studies Network (UK) is delighted to announce a ‘Save the Date’ for the forthcoming symposium “Signal Strength: women & media practice in conflict and crisis situations”. In association also with the MeCCSA Women’s Media Studies Network and the British Academy for the humanities and social sciences, the University of Sheffield is planning to host this one day event on Thursday 8th March 2018 – International Women’s Day.

This symposium will examine the extent to which radio – and other forms of media – provide a platform for women who are, or have been, in situations of conflict and crisis. A mix of talks and presentations will address the areas of radio and media, as implicated in women’s experiences of conflict and crisis around the world.

Drawing on practice and academic research, discussions will explore multiple angles such as: – gendering media strategies to improve the recognition and representation of women in peril; issues surrounding the safety and protection of women journalists and aid workers; and the limits and limitation of media freedoms.

Speakers include: Caroline Vuillemin, CEO, Fondation Hirondelle, Lausanne; Dr Helen Turton, University of Sheffield; Tala Halawa, BBC, West Bank. Details regarding further speakers and the cfp will be issued shortly but for now, please save the date! Please direct any queries to e.heywood@sheffield.ac.uk

Programme for Sonic Cyberfeminisms is now online…

Following on from the post on the Call for contributions: SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS   The conference will begin later this week.  Check it out here.

Call for contributions: SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS

SONIC CYBERFEMINISMS
UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN, UK
5-6th MAY 2017

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: 12 FEBRUARY 2017

Details here:  https://soniccyberfeminisms.wordpress.com/

New Article: “Innovation, women’s work and the documentary impulse: pioneering moments and stalled opportunities in public service broadcasting in Australia and Britain” by Virginia Madsen

Another dispatch from Australia:

 

Virginia Madsen has just published a new article comparing women’s work on features in Australian and Britain in Media Australia International.  (And indeed, do check out all of Media International Australia, Volume 161, Issue 1, dealing with women’s work)

 

Abstract

This article explores the roles of some of the key women producers, broadcasters and writers who were able to work within the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) from their foundational periods to the 1950s. Despite the predominantly male culture of radio broadcasting from the 1920s to the 1970s, this article considers the significance and long-term impacts of some of these overlooked female pioneers at the forefront of developing a range of new reality and ‘talk’ forms and techniques. While the article draws on primary BBC research, it also aims to address these openings, cultures and roles as they existed historically for women in the ABC. How did the ABC compare in its foundational period? Significantly, this paper contrasts the two organisations in the light of their approaches to modernity, arguing that BBC features, the department it engendered, and the traditions it influenced, had far reaching impacts; one of these relating to those opportunities opened for women to develop entirely new forms of media communication: the unrehearsed interview and actuality documentary programmes.

Australian Women in Radio online at the NFSA

Carla Teixeira has authored a new online feature for Australia’s National Film and Sound Archive  about “Women in Radio” chronicling the lives and work of many of Australia’s women radio pioneers.   Through texts and sound clips from seven key women in the early years of Australian wireless, it highlights the roles of women not only as presenters and performers but also as writers and producers from the earliest years.

 

 

 

Women hams ride the radio wave in India

Fascinating story on Scroll.in about amateur radio in India, including some references as well to the peculiar culture of gender that has evolved since the earliest days:

 

The term YL, or young lady, meaning an unmarried woman of any age, was coined in 1920 as a concession to the growing number of female hams. In time, when women married, they became known as XYLs, or ex-young ladies. After women operators in 1940 took umbrage to the second term, it became convention to call any licensed female ham, regardless of marital status, YL. Unlicensed wives of operators are XYLs. Men, regardless of marital status, are OM or old man.

Prasad is something of a trailblazer in the world of hams in India, with more awards and felicitations than she can list.

She became a ham in 1980, when there were perhaps only 50 YLs in India. She was a science student, but not familiar with electronics. Nor did she know English at the time, having studied in her first language, Telugu, until then. When she expressed interest in joining up, she faced stiff opposition from her community.

“Because my family are Brahmins, the Brahmins said, ‘No, no, you should not talk to gents. When you go on the radio, you will talk to gents only, no ladies’,” said Prasad. “But my brother-in-law supported me and said that if I become a ham, as a YL, I would be very popular. So I said okay.”

Prasad worked overtime to pick up the skills she needed. Today, she is among the most prominent hams in the country. Her call sign, or unique identifier with which she introduces herself while operating her radio, is VU2RBI.

Do check out the whole article!